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Beer in the Snooker Club (Vintage International)
Beer in the Snooker Club (Vintage International)
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Beer in the Snooker Club (Vintage International)

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Author: Ghali, Waguih

Brand: Vintage

Color: Navy

Number Of Pages: 224

Release Date: 10-06-2014

Details: Product Description Set amidst the turbulence of 1950s Cairo, Beer in the Snooker Club is the story of Ram Bey, an over-educated, under-ambitious young Egyptian struggling to find out where he fits in. Ram’s favorite haunt is the fashionable Cairo Snooker Club, whose members strive to emulate English gentility; but his best friends are young intellectuals who devour the works of Sartre and engage in dangerous revolutionary activities to support Egyptian independence. By turns biting and comic, Beer in the Snooker Club — the first and only book by Waguih Ghali — became a cult classic when it was first published and remains a timeless portrait of a loveable rogue coming of age in turbulent times. Review “One of the best novels about Egypt ever written.” —Adhaf Soueif “Like The Catcher in the Rye in America, [ Beer in the Snooker Club] articulated the identity crisis of a generation. . . . [The novel] presents uncanny parallels to today’s Egypt, where artists, intellectuals and youth at large are beginning to fashion a new cultural republic of sorts even as they also struggle to find their bearings.” — The New York Times “[Ghali is] a plainspoken writer of consummate wryness, grace and humor.” — Los Angeles Times “[The] novel reproduces a cultural state of shock with great accuracy and great humor.” — The Nation “A triumph of genuinely comic social satire.” — The Times Literary Supplement (London) About the Author Waguih Ghali was born in Cairo on February 25th, most likely in 1930. He attended high school in Alexandria and then studied abroad in Europe. Fearing political persecution, he fled Egypt in 1958 and lived in London, also spending time in France, Sweden, and Germany. Ghali authored several personal essays, which appeared in The Guardian between 1957 and 1965. He also spent time as a freelance journalist, reporting for the Times of London and the BBC. Following a battle with depression, Ghali committed suicide in London, at the home of his friend and editor Diana Athill, in 1969. Beer in the Snooker Club is his only finished novel. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. Excerpted from the Introduction I N T R O D U C T I O N “History,” Stephen Dedalus says in Ulysses, “is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.” By the 1960s, this plangent cry was being echoed by many sensitive men and women in Asian and African countries that had only recently entered modern history as sovereign nation-­states. The passionate idealism of anti-­imperialist movements and the longing for justice and dignity that went into the making of many new nations had been compromised by the corruption and ineptitude of the first generation of rulers. The futile cycle of coups and countercoups, and the long game of musical chairs between military strongmen and civilian politicians, had already begun. “The politics that came,” writes the disenchanted Caribbean narrator of V. S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men (1967), “made people aware of their pain. Later they came to see their helplessness.” Few people felt more vulnerable to this postcolonial chaos than members of the property-­owning classes. These local elites had prospered during European rule, often as collaborators in a system of exploitation. Educated in Western or Western-­style institutions, they had become emotionally and spiritually, as well as materially, dependent on the European metropolis, all the while growing aloof from the rest of their compatriots. After independence, they tended to see their often expensive lifestyles, no less than their power, menaced by newly assertive political movements of peasants, factory workers, and ambitious military officers. And even the most altruistic and perceptive of these native aristocrats found themselves thwarted by their remoteness from ordinary lives. Alienation was, for them, more than a pose cheaply borrowed, along with black turtlenecks, from French existentialists. It stultified private life—­a realm

EAN: 8601423479064

Languages: English

Binding: Paperback

Item Condition: UsedLikeNew