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Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood
Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood
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Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood

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Author: Demick, Barbara

Brand: Random House

Color: Multicolor

Edition: Illustrated

Format: Illustrated

Number Of Pages: 288

Release Date: 17-04-2012

Details: Product Description Logavina Street was a microcosm of Sarajevo, a six-block-long history lesson. For four centuries, it existed as a quiet residential area in a charming city long known for its ethnic and religious tolerance. On this street of 240 families, Muslims and Christians, Serbs and Croats lived easily together, unified by their common identity as Sarajevans. Then the war tore it all apart.   As she did in her groundbreaking work about North Korea, Nothing to Envy, award-winning journalist Barbara Demick tells the story of the Bosnian War and the brutal and devastating three-and-a-half-year siege of Sarajevo through the lives of ordinary citizens, who struggle with hunger, poverty, sniper fire, and shellings.   Logavina Street paints this misunderstood war and its effects in vivid strokes—at once epic and intimate—revealing the heroism, sorrow, resilience, and uncommon faith of its people.   With a new Introduction, final chapter, and Epilogue by the author Review “Brilliantly captures the sense of civilian Sarajevo heroism—its pluck, irony, stoicism . . . [By] focusing on one Sarajevo street, Demick is able to evoke the reality of life in the city with accuracy and nuance.”—David Rieff, The Philadelphia Inquirer   “[A] beautifully rendered portrait of Sarajevo.”—Mark Danner, The New York Review of Books   “Barbara Demick shapes the history of one city street into a small masterpiece.”—Jim Dwyer, columnist, The New York Times   “If you can read only one book about Bosnia, this should be the one.”—Mary McGrory, syndicated columnist, The Washington Post   “Take a walk on Logavina Street—you’ll learn a lot about the heroism and courage of the human race.”—Georgie Anne Geyer, columnist and author, Universal Press Syndicate About the Author Barbara Demick is the Beijing bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times. Her book Nothing to Envy was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her reporting on North Korea won the Overseas Press Club’s award for human rights reporting as well as awards from the Asia Society and the American Academy of Diplomacy. Her coverage of Sarajevo for The Philadelphia Inquirer won the George Polk Award and the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in international reporting. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. 1 DENIAL A plaque identifies a mustard-yellow house on Loga-vina Street as the residence and office of Esad Taljanović, stomatolog—dentist. You enter into a formal dining room dominated by a well-polished mahogany table, which is invariably spread with a lace cloth and, in summer, dressed with fresh-cut flowers in a crystal vase. It looks as though the Taljanovićs are expecting guests for tea and scones. At almost any hour, Šaćira Taljanović, Esad’s wife, answers the door with a fresh coating of pink lipstick, her blond hair brushed back behind a velvet headband. Esad is a tall, fit man with a confident, white grin, as befits his profession. Whether speaking to a gape-mouthed patient or sitting around the dining room table, he is happy to expound his many theories of politics and culture. But Esad is also willing to admit when he is wrong, and he was dead wrong during the winter of 1991–92, when he declared to anyone who would listen: There will be no war in Sarajevo. As far as Esad and many of his friends were concerned, war was something you watched on television. Something the old folks reminisced about. Well past the point when they should have known better, Sarajevans found it simply inconceivable that their country would succumb to the lunacy of war. Throughout the last half of 1991, large swaths of Croatia were in flames. Esad and Šaćira followed developments in the Croatian war from the comfort of their living room, watching the nightly news and reading the papers every morning. As educated people, they naturally were concerned, especially when the

EAN: 9780812982763

Languages: English

Binding: Paperback

Item Condition: UsedLikeNew