Publisher's Outlet Store! ****** 70% OFF Every Book! ****** All new closeouts and remainders!

Parenting an Only Child: the Joys and Challenges of Raising Your One and Only
Parenting an Only Child: the Joys and Challenges of Raising Your One and Only
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Parenting an Only Child: the Joys and Challenges of Raising Your One and Only
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Parenting an Only Child: the Joys and Challenges of Raising Your One and Only

Parenting an Only Child: the Joys and Challenges of Raising Your One and Only

Regular price
$14.99
Sale price
$14.99
Regular price
$14.99
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Author: Newman, Susan

Brand: Harmony

Color: Multicolor

Edition: Revised and Upd

Features:

  • Harmony

Number Of Pages: 288

Release Date: 14-08-2001

Details: Product Description Is it possible to raise a contented only child? Can we be happy with only one child? The answer to both of these questions is a resounding yes. In recent years, the number of couples choosing to have one child has risen sharply. Whether it's by choice or fate, having a single child presents unique considerations, opportunities, and advantages. Social psychologist Susan Newman, who has been studying single-child families since the 1980s, shatters the myths of the lonely, spoiled only child, and provides in-depth coverage of the critical issues including: • Making the right family size decision for you • Withstanding the pressure to have another • Maintaining a balance of power in a three-member household • Single-parenting the only child • Setting boundaries with a child who is used to having your undivided attention • Fostering high achievement, creativity, and independence in only children • The effects of having parents, instead of siblings, as role models • Confronting age-old only-child stereotypes • Building family networks and other support systems for the future Presenting fascinating findings and family stories, Dr. Newman shares her knowledge and gives down-to-earth advice, making this the most accessible, up-to-date handbook of its kind. For couples who are already raising an only child, or for those who are exploring the option, Parenting an Only Child offers encouraging clarity and singular insight. Now with a new resource section. From Publishers Weekly Forget about Leave It to Beaver, argues Newman (Little Things Mean a Lot) in this revised edition. These days, who needs siblings? They cost more money, demand more time and clutter up the house. One child may be the perfect balance for career types who want a family, or for older parents unwilling or unable to go through another pregnancy. Newman first lays out and debunks myths about the sad lives of only children: "onlies" or "singletons" are not shy, aggressive, spoiled or maladjusted. In the book's most trying section, she presents research and testimonies from parents of only children and from "adult onlies," which are helpful but occasionally sound somewhat scripted. She often seems defensive, and sometimes attacks families with multiple children noting, for example, that having four children is no longer "socially acceptable," or that only children see therapists more frequently simply because their parents are more attuned to their emotions. Yet discussing a case of sibling rivalry, she somewhat smugly recounts that the older child had to see a therapist because of aggression. This selectivity grates, especially later when she addresses exactly those issues that she previously dubbed myths e.g., the spoiled child, or "little adult syndrome." Nonetheless, she expertly discusses the finer points of raising an only child, with tips for encouraging sharing, making sure your child isn't running the household and guarding against a "state-of-the-art Child" that would help any parent in our affluent, child-centered times. Though she is generally too biased to help parents who are equivocating about family size, Newman's appealing, no-nonsense delivery and solid, reassuring advice will behoove those who already know that they will have only one child. (On-sale Aug. 14) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc. From the Inside Flap Is it possible to raise a contented only child? Can we be happy with only one child? The answer to both of these questions is a resounding yes. In recent years, the number of couples choosing to have one child has risen sharply. Whether it's by choice or fate, having a single child presents unique considerations, opportunities, and advantages. Social psychologist Susan Newman, who has been studying single-child families since the 1980s, shatters the myths of the lonely, spoiled only child, and provides in-depth coverage of the critical issues including: ? Making the right family size de

EAN: 9780767906296

Languages: English

Binding: Paperback

Item Condition: UsedLikeNew